Category: Players

Mike Foley

Started playing with NY Titans in 1963. Long Island was tough to advance to Nationals, because you had Musicaros and then County Sports and only the winner went. The Titans were always second in the NYC/Long Island regionals and only the winner went. Foley batted .700 and used to hit 50 home runs in the 25 game season in Queens where the Titans played. Steve Shurina, Bill Malloy also played with Titans. Musicaros always had Lou Russo and Galloway, but County Sports picked those two up for Nationals. in 1966, they split up NYC and Long Island and both champs went to Nationals. That was the year County won 10 straight in 36 hours only to lose in the Final to Michael’s Lounge in Parma, Ohio. The Titans finished in 5th. Mort Weinberg made the all American team for the Titans. he was 13-21, .619, 3 home runs. Foley hit about the same, but had 8-9 home runs.

in 1967/1968, The Titans became the Hicksville Astros and they had Bill Malloy, Steve Shurina, Joe Konicki, Lou Russo, Oscar Steadman, Rocky Salice. County Sports beat them in the regionals. So Hicksville stayed home. Doc Linnihan would always pickup Shurina and Malloy for Nationals because they both could play OF/IF and Pitch. Foley was just an OF.

in 1969, Hicksville got to go to the Nationals because County Sports won in 1968 and got an automatic berth to nationals. County finished fourth that year (Copper Hearth won). Hicksville finished tied for 5th. After County Sports won the Nationals in 1968, a few of the Astros went over to County Sports notably Salice and Malloy. Steve Shurina, Joe Konicki, who led the 1969 ASA Nationals in hitting (16-20, 800) in 1969 stayed along with Lou Russo, Oscar Steadman, and Mike Foley. A couple of the Astros made the All America team in 1969, obviously Konicki and second basemen Joe Petriello, who batted .450. Foley didn’t appear on the batting chart because he hit home runs his first time up in each game then was intentionally walked. So he didn’t get enough at bats. They said he was like 9 for 9 with 9 home runs.

in 1970 and 1971, Foley played with Hicksville Astros and could not beat County Sports for the NYC/Long Island Regional, so the Astros played USSSA. They finished in the top five in both those years. Back then the USSSA just had a East and and a West World and the two winners would meet the following year in the USSSA World Series. Mike Foley made the USSSA Eastern All World for Hicksville both years and let the tournament in home runs one year and Batting the other, I think. Hicksville finished in the top 4 each year.

After 1971, County Sports and Hicksville Astros merged and also got a big corporate Sponsor from Empire Vending Company of NYC. The team was called the Empire County Astros for a few years, then Empire County Sports and then Pepsico in 1976 and 1977.


1972

County Sports was 9th, 3 of their players were picked for the team.

  • Bill Malloy (17-23, .739, 5 HRs, 8 RBIs)
  • Steve Shurina (17-23, .739, 5 HRs, 11 RBIs)
  • Jim Galloway (16-23, .696, 7 HRs, 15 RBIs)

Mike Foley (17-27, .630, 7 HRs, 16 RBIs) – he batted lead off for them for ever.


1973

  • 1st Team Outfielder, Mike Foley (29-41, .707, 16 HRs, 35 RBIs)

1974

  • 1st Team Utility, Mike Foley (12-22, .545, 1 HR, 9 RBIs) – in York with bad balls and long fences.

1975

  • 1st Team Utility, Mike Foley (11-15, .733, 5 RBIs) – In Cleveland in rain the year Pyramid won

Batting leader was Dave Rumpke of Cambridge Square (14-19, .737), Foley was second .004 points behind.


1976

  • 1st Team Utility, Mike Foley (15-19, .789, 8 HRs, 17 RBIs)

Batting leader was Mike Nye (23-29, .793) Foley was second .004 points behind again.


He was less then 1/10th of a point away from two ASA National Batting crowns. And Steve Barkan says he got ripped off both times as the Official scorer was always 1 hit off with his stats.

Mike Foley went to the Pro League in 1977. He finished in the top-10 in batting as he batted .585 with 24 HRs and 71 RBIs for half a season. The New York Clippers lost their financial backing and a guy that ran a team in Poughkeepsie took over the team and cut every player, including Galloway. Gary Richter, Mike Foley, Larry Chiapetta, Sam Sapienza, Hank Cluess, John Dunn, Steve Shurina all got cut so this guy could bring his Amateur Team to the Pro League (I think it was Pelltown Taxi, a class-A team).

In 1978, the New York guys ended up with the New Jersey Statesmen. Foley was the only guy to make the All Pro team (he batted .563 with 35 HRs and 109 RBIs).

in 1979, The New Jersey team brought most of their Trenton Capitals team to the Pro League. The New York guys either left Pro ball or went to with the Philadelphia A’s or the New England Pilgrims. Gary Richter and Foley stayed with Trenton and Richter made all pro. Foley had a better year, but wasn’t selected. I heard he and Pepitone didn’t see eye to eye. Pepitone was the Trenton Manager.

1980 and after, Foley left softball and then made a short comeback for County Sports in 1981 when they won the USSSA A World Series. But he had put on weight and basically was not the same. He became a personal driver for actor Ed Asner for many years. Another guy who was great, but his career ended earlier than expected. Steve Barkan will tell you how good Mike Foley was. He found one of the old stat sheets for County Sports from 1973. Said Foley won the team batting title a couple of points higher than Galloway. (like .685 to .683). Davide was third in low 600s. Galloway had 103 home runs, with Foley 97, and Davide close behind him at 95. The team only played about 60-70 game schedule then. And Mike Foley had the strongest arm from the OF then anybody that ever played there.

Nobody could tough Galloway, who would field a grounder at first, backhand it to second base and then get the throw back for the DP. Galloway played third base in short left and on 60 foot bases, threw people out taking his time. He would hit 80 home runs in a 35 game season at Jones Beach where the win blew across from Right to left and Galloway’s home runs all went to right center or right field. Until they finally talked him into using an aluminum bat. He used a wood bat up until 1973. Davide hit his wooden bat and Galloway had to use an aluminum one and hit a HR in York over the CF wall at the stadium.

County Sports Players

COUNTY SPORTS LEGENDS

Jim Galloway

Lou Russo

Bert Smith

Bill Brown – (2 Time ASA All American Pitcher)

(4) ASA Nationals with County Sports – 1966-1969 – (2nd, 3rd, 1st, 3rd)

Pitching Record – (26-6); Batting Record – (63-105, .600, 24 HRs, 54 RBIs

OTHERS

College Football (Syracuse University) – (C/LB)

Captain 1957 Orange Bowl Team – All Big East for two years.

Professional Football (AFL Boston Patriots) – 1960 AFL Season Starting LB

Played 14 games, started 11. Had an Interception and Fumble Recovery

High School Football Coach – Berner High School Massapequa Park

Nassau County Coach of the Year Three Times, 3 Undefeated Seasons

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Len Meckalavage

1966 ASA Nationals with County Sports

Had 4 HRs and 17 RBIs in the National Tournament

High School Football Coach – Roosevelt High School

Nassau County Coach of the Year Two Times, 3 Straight Championships

23 game Winning streak from 1964-1966.

Former All-Star Halfback for Roosevelt High School.

Started Coaching in Dayton, OH, then Amityville, NY before Roosevelt

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Bob Schugman

1968 ASA All American Outfielder for County Sports

Played in 12 ASA Major National Championships with Musicaro’s and County Sports

High School Baseball and Football Coach – Baldwin High School

Played Soccer for Brockport State College

Won Nassau County High School Baseball Championship in 1977

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Charlie Forte

1969 ASA All American Shortstop for County Sports

Batted .679 with 5 HRs and 10 RBIs

High School Basketball and Golf Coach – Huntington High School

All Suffolk County All-Star teams in Football, Basketball and Baseball at Huntington High

Played Baseball and Basketball at Wake Forest University

Emilio “Zeke” Sinicola

NIAGARA UNIV., N.Y. – Niagara men’s basketball great and former NBA player Emilio “Zeke” Sinicola (class of ’51) passed away on Monday morning at the Veterans Hopsital in New York City after a brief illness. “Zeke”, as he was popularly known, became the first Niagara player to pass the 1,000 career-point mark and finished his career with 1,188 points, which was then a Western New York record. Sinicola played for Niagara from 1948-51 where he was a member of Niagara’s first-ever NIT team, accomplishing the feat as junior in 1950. As a senior, Sinicola earned All-American honors from the Sporting News (second team), Helms Foundation (third team) and Converse Yearbook (fourth team). Sinicola’s No. 19 jersey is one of five retired numbers hanging from the ceiling at the Gallagher Center. The trio of Sinicola (19), Tom Birch (11) and Jim Moran (21) all had their jerseys retired following their senior season in 1951 after they carried Niagara to a 62-24 record in three years. “This is a sad day for Niagara Basketball,” Niagara head coach Joe Mihalich said. “Zeke Sinicola is someone who put Niagara Basketball on the map and we will always be indebted to Zeke for his contributions to the Purple Eagles.” After graduating with a BS in economics Sinicola was drafted by the Fort Wayne Pistons in the 1951 NBA draft where he played until 1954. Sinicola was elected to the Niagara Hall of Fame in 1967. He continued as an active athlete for most of his adult life playing softball with various teams on Long Island and in New Jersey well into his fifties. In 1985 he was inducted into the Long Island Amateur Softball Association Hall of Fame. As a youngster Zeke had been standout athlete at Benjamin Franklin High School in East Harlem and in 2005 the New York Athletic Club honored Sinicola by naming him to the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame. Sinicola was born on January 25, 1929 to Giovamina Durante and Francesco Sinicola, the third of four children. Except for a tour of duty with the US Army in Korea, Sinicola lived in the neighborhood where he grew up. After his basketball days he enjoyed a varied and rewarding career that included serving as a recreation manager with the NYC Parks Department; an elementary school teacher; and, an independent retailer. Of these he often said that teaching a class of fifth graders brought the greatest joy. In his later years he discovered another joy — writing fiction. Shortly before his illness he put the finishing touches on the last of three novels.

NOTE – Sinicola played with the Nighthawks of Queens and Musicaro’s of Massapequa

And later, before he retired, in the Tri-State League with County Sports for some games as needed, but not in ASA Advanced Play

Another Jim Galloway Home Run

The Legends of County Sports Softball

Doc Linnehan

George Linnehan

Steve Barkan

Jim Galloway

Bert Smith

Lou Russo

Bill Brown

Mike Foley    

Bob Schugman

John Davide

Gary Richter

Rick Leek

Len Meckalavage 

Oscar Steadman

Bill Malloy

Steve Shurina

Rocky Salice

Joe Konicki

Ray Frisch

JR Elio

Charlie Forte

Tom Croci

Cliff White

Bob Lombardi

Joe Petriello

Sam Sapienza

Craig Menzl

Larry Chiapetta

Hank Cluess

John Dunn

Steve Kurman

Doug Hommell

Ed Finnegan

Steve Beccalari

John DiBiase

Jim Waryold

Tom Filgate

George Pajonas

   

Fred Stahman

Pete O’Leary

Ernie Hicks

Chan Baker

Ron Dorsey

Brian Reed

Sal Romano

Rick Barile

Jim Sommers

Ed Scherer

Tony Dobies

Ron Hargrove

JR Santoianni

Bill Linnehan    

IF I missed anybody, it was not intentional – I know Leon Curiel, Mauro Chiti and Glenn Dorch played, but I cannot find any photos of them. If any of the players have better photos they want on here or have someone missing that should be here – Please just Email me, Thanks – Steve (sdimitry@verizon.net)

Mike Shenk

http://www.bigcat844.com/images/32-shenk-view-444.jpg

Click on the link to see Mike Shenk’s interview with Mike Macenko

http://www.bigcat844.com/legends_shenk.html

Image result for Mike Shenk Softball

I want to thank Mike Shenk for his many years of friendship and for teaching me the proper way to play this game. Don’t worry about what YOU do, worry about what your TEAM does. This man honestly had no idea that he had all these accomplishments, the ONLY thing he ever counted was Championships. To this day, he still wears his 2001 Grand Slam Ring he got for playing with Long Haul when they won all four Associations Super National Championships. He told me many times, he would rather wear that instead of any of the Hall of Fame Rings he has. He is humbled by the Accolades and appreciates them, but what he values to this day are the people he played with and the friendships he made while winning Championships. He is a GOOD man and I am honored that we are friends. Thank You Mike Shenk.

Mike Shenk, Ephrata, PA (Third-Base)

Mike Shenk began playing softball after high school as a fast pitch player. He played fast pitch for two years and switched to slow pitch in order to be able to play the game with his friends. In his eleven-year career in the major and super division he batted over 600 every year, hitting over 700 in five of those years. He hit a total of 1,098 home runs in those eleven years. Remember most of those major and super games were played in baseball fields or fields with baseball type fence distances. The stats he compiled for playing only at the highest level in the country was incredible. And one has to remember, he played with and against the best of the best and still compiled these incredible numbers. All the championships he won were at a time when there were consistently between 10-20 Major or Super teams in the country, unlike today, when it is luck if you find 3 Major teams in the whole country. He competed in a hitting demonstration in Detroit at Tigers’ Stadium and hit balls off the Press Box with a couple balls hitting the facing of the right field roof of the stadium. Truly amazing. Mike and his wife Kathy and two children reside in Ephrata, Pennsylvania. He is currently the ASA of Pennsylvania State Slow Pitch Deputy Commissioner and is a great ambassador for this sport in his home state, always saving time to help a young player with batting lessons and even though he is an imposing figure to say the least, still weighing in at a solid 290 lbs of muscle, his “Bulldog” nickname is a far cry from his real personality of a genuine person, great husband, father and loyal friend to those who know him best. He brings an aura of respect and integrity to the whole ASA of Pennsylvania softball program with his presence alone.

Mike was Inducted into the ASA of PA Hall of Fame by Andy Loechner in 2007. He played locally in the state when he started and won the 1987 and 1988 Class-A ASA of PA State Championship with is local team, Farrell’s Maintenance of Lititz, PA. His team finished in the top 7 for the next three years (1989-4th, 1990-5th & 1991-7th) in ASA of PA State Class-Major/Class-A competition. He went to a local tournament in Delaware and was discovered by the late Bill Taylor of Taylor Brothers in Providence, RI and played ASA Major ball for Taylor Brothers for the next 2 years. (1992 and 1993). In 1994, he joined Shen Valley of Virginia and Played at the highest level in the country, ASA Super Softball until his retirement in 2002. He played for some of the best teams of all-time including Shen Valley, Lighthouse, Ritch’s-Superior, Team TPS and arguably the greatest team ever, the 2001 Long Haul/TPS team that compiled an incredible 70-6 Record in Super-Major play that season including winning the Grand Slam title (ASA, NSA, ISA and USSSA world titles), going undefeated in all four Association’s Championship play. Mike Shenk was a 9-time ASA National All-American selection and his teams won the ASA Super National Championship an incredible six (6) times, including four (4) in a row from 1999-2002. He also led teams that won the ASA’s Prestigious Smokey Mountain Classic on three (3) occasions. Mike Shenk’s team never finished less than 4th in the Super Softball Final rankings from 1994-2002. His teams finished in the top-2 for 7 of the 9 years he played the Super level. He was considered the ultimate team player and furthermore -simply – a winner as his career record in Super-major play was 569-172 (77% Winning Pct.). From 1996 through 2001, Mike Shenk was selected to the National Media All-Star teams by Famous Softball writers Jerome Earnest and Gordie Heagle. Here is the official information: (1996, 1st team Utility; 1997, Honorable Mention third baseman; and from 1998 through 2001, 1st team third baseman). He also was selected as the 2nd team – Third-baseman to the 1990’s All-Decade team by Jerome Earnest (behind only Charles Wright). And also fitting, Jerome Earnest selected Mike Shenk to the All-Time All-Century team as an Honorable Mention Third-baseman. (Behind only ASA Hall of Famer Paul Tomasovich and Charles Wright). He is widely regarded one of the top-3 third basemen of all-time and also one of the top-10 left handed hitters of all-time. Including his ASA Championships, he has won over 15 National Championships at the highest level counting all associations. And also including his ASA honors, he has garnered over 22 National All-American/All-World team selections counting all associations, including three (3) National MVP awards plus a Defensive MVP award.

Mike Shenk

Although he started out playing fast pitch, Hall of Fame inductee Mike Shenk made his mark playing major level slow pitch softball from 1992 through 2002, playing for various teams throughout his career. Shenk began playing fast pitch softball after high school and played for two years before switching to slow pitch to play with his friends. During his 11-year career, Shenk has been named All American 22 times and has won 16 National Championships along with a lifetime batting average of.701 and has hit more than 1,500 home runs during his softball career. He batted .700 or higher five times of which his highest batting average was .739 in 2000 which included personal-high 144 homers. In the past years, Shenk had to shorten his softball career because of kidney problems but after receiving a kidney transplant, he is back on the ball field playing 40 & over. In the Super Nationals, Shenk batted .755, (117-for-155), hit 42 homers and drove in 113 RBI. Some of the top slow pitch teams boasted Shenk on their roster including Farrell Maintenance (1987-1989), Taylor Brothers (1990-1992) Shen Valley, Lighthouse (1995-1996), Ritch’s-Superior (1997), Team TPS, Team Easton and Long Haul/TPS in 2001 when the won the “Grand Slam of Softball.” In 2007, Shenk was inducted into the ASA of Pennsylvania Hall of Fame. He played for a local team in 1987 and 1988 and helped it win two ASA of PA state titles. In 1994, he joined Shen Valley and continued to play at the top level of men’s slow pitch until he retired after playing the 2002 season.

ASA Major/Super All America Team Honors (Tournament Stats listed if available):

These are the events where Mike Shenk was named ASA All-American

  • 1992 ASA Major Nationals – Taylor Brothers of RI (no stats available)
  • 1993 ASA Major Nationals – Taylor Brothers of RI (no stats available)
  • 1994 ASA Super Nationals – Shen Velley/TPS of VA (15 RBIs, only available stat)
  • 1995 ASA Super Nationals – Lighthouse/Worth of GA (16-22, .727, 3 HRs, 13 RBIs)
  • 1996 ASA Super Nationals – Lighthouse/Worth of GA (25-31, .806, 11 HRs, 22 RBIs)
  • 1997 ASA Super Nationals – Ritch’s-Superior/TPS of CT (23-32, .719, 7 HRs, 18 RBIs)
  • 2000 ASA Super Nationals – Team TPS of KY (30-35, .857, 10 HRs, 20 RBIs)
  • 2001 ASA Super Nationals – Long Haul/TPS of MN (10-18, .556, 6 HRs, 18 RBIs)
  • 2002 ASA Super Nationals – Long Haul/TPS of MN (13-17, .765, 5 HRs, 7 RBIs)

Available Totals for ASA Super Nationals – (117-155, .755 average, 42 HRs, 113 RBIs)

ASA Major/Super National Championship Results

(also the final team ranking and final overall season record in Super-Major play)
Year – Team Played for – ASA Result Final Standings (Record)

  • 1992 – Taylor Brothers, Providence, RI – Major and Super Nationals – 25th -final rank (record unavailable)
  • 1993 – Taylor Brothers, Providence, RI – Major and Super Nationals – 18th -final rank – (41-19 Record)
  • 1994 – Shen Valley/TPS, Bridgewater, VA – 4th ASA Super Nationals – 4th -final rank – (record unavailable)
  • 1995 – Lighthouse/Worth, Stone Mountain, GA – 1st ASA Super Nationals – 2nd -final rank – (56-25 Record)
  • 1996 – Lighthouse/Worth, Stone Mountain, GA – 3rd ASA Super Nationals – 2nd -final rank – (60-27 Record)
  • 1997 – Ritch’s-Superior/TPS, Windsor Locks, CT – 1st ASA Super Nationals – 1st -final rank – (67-19 Record)
  • 1998 – Team TPS, Louisville, KY – 3rd ASA Super Nationals – 1st -final rank – (70-17 Record)
  • 1999 – Team Easton, Burlingame, CA – 1st ASA Super Nationals – 2nd -final rank – (56-27 Record)
  • 2000 – Team TPS, Louisville, KY – 1st ASA Super Nationals – 1st -final rank – (79-15 Record)
  • 2001 – Long Haul/TPS, Albertville, MN – 1st ASA Super Nationals – 1st in final rank – (70-6 Record)
  • 2002 – Long Haul/TPS, Albertville, MN – 1st ASA Super Nationals – 3rd in final rank – (70-17 Record)

Annual Major/Super Batting Statistics (Compiled by Jerome Earnest/Hank Basset)
Year ABs Hits HRs Avg. Team

  • 1992 – – 35 .669 Taylor Brothers of RI
  • 1993 218 148 68 .679 Taylor Brothers of RI
  • 1994 294 200 89 .680 Shen Valley/DJ’s Sports/TPS of VA
  • 1995 362 250 121 .691 Lighthouse/Worth of GA
  • 1996 407 295 133 .725 Lighthouse/Worth of GA
  • 1997 383 269 93 .702 Ritch’s-Superior/TPS of CT
  • 1998 390 286 106 .733 Team TPS of KY
  • 1999 339 235 122 .693 Team Easton of CA
  • 2000 437 323 144 .739 Team TPS of KY
  • 2001 340 239 99 .703 Long Haul/TPS of MN
  • 2002 360 247 88 .686 Long Haul/TPS of MN

Total 3530 2492 1098 .706

Mike Shenk is a player who has Hall of Fame numbers including the World Championship Teams he has played on to his batting average. But Mike will be the first to say that none of these accolades would be possible without the team mates he had over his career. Mike has won five NSA World Championship, Runner-up twice and Third twice. While playing NSA from 1993 to 2001, Mike was selected to the All World Team seven times, was World Series MVP once and All World Defensive Player once. During his years playing the NSA Major level, Mike had a batting average of .735 with 52 Homeruns and 112 RBIs. Those who witnessed Mike’s play, all will say he was the best 3rd Baseman to play the game. Mike’s wife Kathleen and their children Derrick and Kristina have stood by his side while he played the game he loves. For years Mike traveled the country but never faltered as being a husband and father. Any NSA umpire that worked a game that Mike played in will attest that he was a true gentleman on and off the field. Due to being unable to attend the Class of 2016 Induction Ceremony, Mike Shenk was inducted into the NSA Sports Hall of Fame in the Player Category on November 2, 2017.

Name – Mike Shenk

Position – Third Base

Year – 2012

Mike Shenk is a 2-time USSSA Major World Series Champion, a 4-time All-World Series Selection, the 1998 World Series MVP and now, a USSSA Hall of Fame member. A third basemen who has been affiliated with the association since 1990, Mike remembers the World Series of 1998 like it was yesterday. “I was playing for TPS and we were told on Saturday that we were part of the leaders bracket playing Sunday morning,” he reminisces, “We headed out to a 7am batting practice for an 8am game and after playing five games in a row, we didn’t step off of that field until 9 at night. We came back and became the 1998 World Series Champions, winning the final game on a walk off walk. I’ll never forget it.” With an impressive career behind him, Mike has made his mark on USSSA history.

Bob Holland, USSSA’s Atlantic Coast Vice President for 30 years running, re-iterates Mike’s accomplishments and athletic talents, “Mike Shenk was the best slow pitch player to come out of Pennsylvania.” Bob adds, “I had the pleasure to watch him grow as a young raw talent, to one of the best that slow pitch has seen in his era.” When asked what it means to be inducted into the Hall of Fame, Mike said “This means everything to me. I was fortunate enough to play for some of the best teams to ever play. Throughout my career, the goal was to be there and give 110% to my team. That’s why it’s hard to go into the Hall of Fame, because without my team this wouldn’t be possible.” His advice to young and aspiring baseball and softball players, “You can never take enough batting practice and always be prepared and there for your teammates.”

TEAM USA

Mike Shenk and Bruce Meade – Honorary Captains for Team USA

Mike Macenko

The Greatest Home Run Hitter of ALL TIME – Mike Macenko

http://bigcat844.com

  • Voted into the NSA Hall of Fame in 1997 and Inducted on November 11, 1998 in Tunica, Mississippi.
  • Voted into the ISA Hall of Fame in 1997 and Inducted on December 4, 1998 in Clearwater, Florida (Charter Member).
  • Voted into the USSSA Hall of Fame in 1998 and inducted on November 1999 in Savannah, Georgia.
  • Voted into the ASA Hall of Fame in 2006 and inducted on November 8, 2007 in Louisville, Kentucky
  • Became only the second player in History to make all FOUR Association’s Hall of Fames.
  • Inducted into the State of Ohio ASA Hall Of Fame in 2007 in Columbus, Ohio
  • Inducted into the Greater Cleveland Softball Hall of Fame in 2000 in Cleveland, Ohio
  • Inducted into the Brunswick, Ohio Sports Hall Of Fame in 2002
  • Inducted into the Greater Cleveland Sports Hall Of Fame in 2010
  • Inducted into the State of Ohio USSSA Hall of Fame in 2012

  • Hammered almost 7000 Home Runs in 25 seasons (averages out to about 247 Home Runs per year). – MOST of All Time.
  • 1977 ASA Men’s Open National Batting Champion. – Was 15-20, for a .750 Batting Average.
  • 1981 National Slow Pitch Conference (NSPC) “HR and RBI King” – Had 46 HRs with 94 RBIs. Selected to First Team All-Conference as a Second Basemen.
  • 1986 Started NSA World Series with 21 Straight Hits – Selected as the World Series MVP.
  • 1986 Blasted 430 ft. Home Run in Denver’s Mile High Stadium.
  • 1987 Crushed a 508-foot Tape Measure Home Run in Las Vegas, NV.
  • 1987 Seattle Kingdome “Home Run Contest-King”.
  • 1987 Went 172 games in a row with at least one hit.
  • 1987 Launched 844 HRs (set NATIONAL RECORD). – Had 1534 RBIs and batted .744.
  • 1988 Pounded 830 more HRs in 1988 – Had 1667 RBIs with a .745 Batting Average.
  • 1988 ISA World Series “Home Run King” – Was 23-25, .920 Batting Average and 13 HRs.
  • 1988 Busted 10 Home Runs in one game (set NATIONAL RECORD).
  • 1988 Drove in 1687 runs (RBIs) in one year (set NATIONAL RECORD).
  • 1988 Cracked 16 Home Runs in a Doubleheader in West Palm Beach, FL.
  • 1988 Cranked 12 Home runs in consecutive at bats on the same tournament.
  • 1988 Hit 5 Homers in one game completely out of Jacksonville, FL Minor League Stadium.
  • 1989 Olympic Festival “Home Run King” – had 14 HRs in just six games.
  • 1990 NSA World Series “Home Run King” – Was 24-29, .828 Batting Average and 16 HRs.
  • 1993 ISA World Series “Home Run King” – Was 21-28, .750 Batting Average and 14 HRs.
  • 1993 Smoky Mountain Classic “Home Run King” – Had 17 HRs and 33 RBIs.
  • 1994 Rocketed two balls on top of the roof in right field at Detroit Tiger’s Stadium and actually hit one ball completely out of the stadium but it was just foul.

  • Smoky Mountain Classic Most Valuable Player 1986 – Maryville, Tennessee (22-31, .710, 11 HRs, 20 RBIs)
  • Smoky Mountain Classic Most Valuable Player 1987- Maryville, Tennessee (29-34, .853, 21 HRs, 39 RBIs)
  • Gateway Classic Most Valuable Player 1984 – St. Louis, Missouri (25-30, .833, 13 HRs, 35 RBIs)
  • Gateway Classic Most Valuable Player 1985 – St. Louis, Missouri (20-26, .769, 14 HRs, 32 RBIs)
  • Gateway Classic Most Valuable Player 1996 – St. Louis, Missouri (32-36, .889, 14 HRs, 35 RBIs)
  • Cleveland Stroh’s Tourney MVP 1979 – Cleveland, Ohio (15-24, .625, 12 HRs, 22 RBIs)
  • Coors/Steele’s Classic Most Valuable Player 1985 – Cleveland, Ohio (22-29, .759, 14 HRs, 36 RBIs)
  • Coors/Steele’s Classic Most Valuable Player 1990 – Cleveland, Ohio (20-27, .741, 12 HRs, 26 RBIs)
  • York, Pennsylvania NSPC Tourney MVP 1981- York, Pennsylvania (10-15, .667, 8 HRs)
  • East Detroit, Michigan NSPC Qualifier MVP 1981 – Detroit, Michigan (23-27, .852, 12 HRs, 27 RBIs)
  • Cleveland, Ohio NSPC Qualifier 1981 MVP – Willoughby, Ohio (8 HRs)
  • Dudley USSSA NIT Classic Most Valuable Player 1987 Petersburg, Virginia
  • Tullahoma, Tennessee USSSA NIT MVP 1991 – Tullahoma, Tennessee
  • Demarini Classic MVP ASA Qualifier 1995 – Portland, Oregon
  • Fort Wayne Classic MVP 1983 – Ft. Wayne, Indiana
  • Cincinnati Shootout USSSA NIT 1990 MVP – Cincinnati, Ohio
  • East Carolina Classic USSSA NIT MVP 1987 – Wilson, North Carolina

  • NSA World Series MVP 1986 – Houston, Texas (27-31, .871, 15 HRs, 24 RBIs) – also the Batting Leader
  • ASA Super National Championship MVP 1987- Parma, Ohio (27-36, .750, 12 HRs, 26 RBIs) – also the Batting Leader
  • ISA World Series MVP 1987- Greensboro, North Carolina (27-37, .730, 15 HRs, 24 RBIs)
  • ASA Super Nationals MVP 1990- Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (27-31, .871, 18 HRs, 34 RBIs, 29 Runs)
  • NSA World Series MVP 1990 – Cleveland, Ohio (24-29, .828, 16 HRs, 23 RBIs, 21 Runs) – 8 HRs in final game

  • When Mike hit 844 HRs, he officially was put into the Guinness Book Of World Records.
  • Retired with a lifetime Batting Average of .721
  • Retired with over 6000 documented Home Runs. Estimated to be close to 7000.
  • Unanimous Selection to All-American/All-World Team 34 times
  • National/World Tournament 5 times
  • Member of 18 National/World Super/Major Championship teams.
  • Led Steele’s to 143 consecutive wins in 1990 season.
  • Member of 4 National Softball Hall of Fames.

MIKE MACENKO HALL OF FAME INFORMATION

The first former member of the Steele’s Silver Bullets elected to the ASA National Softball Hall of Fame, Mike Macenko had a slow pitch career that will be difficult to duplicate let alone surpass. During his 26 years, (starting in 1974) Mike (6-foot-3, in excess of 260 pounds) slammed more than 6,000 home runs, earning ASA All-America honors 11 times including two MVP Awards (1987 and 1990). He was an ASA All-American in 1977, 1984-1988, 1990, 1991, 1993-94. Born November 21, 1955 in Brook Park, Ohio, Mike started his career playing for the Brook Park Merchants in 1973 and caught the eye of Pesano’s manager, Dave Neale, in 1975, who saw Mike in a home-run derby in Lakewood, Ohio and asked him to play for a team he was managing in Cleveland. Mike played for Neale’s team, Hillcrest Tavern from 1976-1980, Nationwide Advertising in 1981 and the Cleveland Competitors in 1982 before joining Steele’s in 1983 through 1990. Mike was a member of five ASA national championship teams. In 1991 Mike joined Sunbelt-Worth before going back to Steele’s-Sunbelt in 1991 and playing another season. In 1994-1995 Mike played for Ritch’s-Superior before joining the Steele’s Hit Men in 1996 and 1997. Mike retired in 1998 but playing briefly in 1999 for R&D/Nike before deciding to retire for good after the 2000 season. Mike had some outstanding seasons for Steele’s and his back-to-back seasons in 1987 and 1988 may never be duplicated. In 1987, he smashed 844 homers and drove in 1,534 runs to go along with a .744 batting average. He followed that season with 830 homers and 1,667 RBIs with a .745 batting average. One of only two players (Don Arndt is the other) to hit more than 6,000 homers in a career and between 1983-1997 hit 4,411 and batted .702 (8,227 hits in 11,720 at-bats). In 1986-1987, he was named MVP of the Smoky Mountain Classic, annually the best men’s invitational slow pitch tournament in America. In 1989, when softball made its debut in the U.S. Olympic Festival (first and only time), Mike batted .568 (21-for-37) and led the festival in homers and total bases (69) in leading the East team. During the 1987-88 seasons, Mike put up some impressive numbers: 12 including nine homers in one game (1987); 16 homers in a doubleheader (1988); 4 homers in one inning (twice in 1987); he had 3 homers in an inning 11 times; five hits in one inning (1987); he had four hits in an inning four times; 17 RBI in one game (twice in 1987); 10 RBI in one inning (on a grand slam and two three-run shots in 1987); 5 home runs in one game out of a minor league baseball park; 12 consecutive homers in 1988; had 11 in a row in 1987; 172 games in a row with at least one hit (1987) and 29 hits in a row, including 14 homers (1987); he had 10 or more consecutive hits a total of 29 times. In 1987, Macenko hit a ball into the media parking lot outside the Las Vegas Softball Complex that was measured at 508 feet. During a 1993 exhibition, he hit 16 of 47 pitches over the fence at the old Cleveland Municipal Stadium, including a 430-foot blast into right-centerfield. Mike is the 31st slow pitch player elected to the ASA National Softball Hall of Fame.

Name Mike Macenko, Position Male Player, Year 1999

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Mike Macenko was inducted into the USSSA Hall of Fame in the Male Player Category. Mike started his career with the USSSA in 1982 with the legendary Steele’s team that crisscrossed the country barnstorming tours in an effort to promote the game of slow pitch softball. He was a feared power hitter with a lifetime batting average of over .600 while batting .541 in USSSA Men’s Major World Series play. In 1987 he set the single season record with an amazing 844 home runs and astounded thousands at Detroit’s Tiger Stadium by hitting a softball out of the stadium during a home run hitting contest. Participating in 17 USSSA Men’s Major World Series, he was a member of the All World Teams at the USSSA Men’s Major World Series in 1989 and again in 1994.

Mike Macenko Player Category, November 1998

Inducted in the NSA Hall of Fame in the Player Category. A native of Brookpark, OH, Mike Macenko is the greatest home run hitter in the history of slow pitch softball. In 27 years of softball, 25 of them in the country’s highest level, Mike hit 7,000 home runs. In 1987 alone, he hit 844 home runs and in 1988 he hit 830, the two greatest seasons by far that any softball player ever enjoyed. A six-foot, three-inch behemoth who tipped the scales at 285 pounds in his playing days, Macenko grew up in Brook Park where he began playing softball in 1973 at the age of 16 with Tom Coyne’s team in the Brook Park Men’s League. Mike joined Steele’s Sports at the age of 18 and continued a 20-year association with teams managed by John and Dave Neale. Steele Sports, a sporting goods firm in Grafton, Ohio, which traveled the country taking on all comers in the ancient tradition of “barnstorming” played more than 100 games a year. In 1986 Sports Illustrated featured them in a story headlined “Men of Steele,” which can be found on Macenko’s web site. He was the most valuable player of five different national tournaments. He was named

Mike Macenko

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Mike Macenko was inducted into the ISA Hall of Fame in Player Category in 1998 in Clearwater, Florida. The Cleveland area native had a long and illustrious career at the top level of softball. He played with national softball powerhouses, Steele’s of Brook Park, OH, and Rithc’s-Superior/TPS from Windsor Locks, Connecticut. The “Big Cat” also played one season with Sunbelt of Centerville, Georgia in 1991 when Steele’s did not field a team. Macenko played on 3 ISA World Championship Teams, was named the MVP of the 1987 series and has been named to 6 All-World Teams. He also holds the record for highest batting average in the ISA World Series with a .920 percentage.

Mike Macenko, Induction Year: 2010, Sport: Softball

He is the greatest home run hitter in the history of slow pitch softball. In 27 years of softball, 25 of them in the country’s highest level, Mike Macenko hit 7,000 home runs. Only one other player in the world ever hit as many as 6,000. In 1987 alone, he hit 844 home runs and in 1988 he hit 830, the two greatest seasons by far that any softball player ever enjoyed.

A six-foot, three-inch behemoth who tipped the scales at 285 pounds in his playing days, Macenko grew up in Brook Park where he began playing softball in 1973 at the age of 16 with Tom Coyne’s team in the Brook Park Men’s League. “In my first game, my first four times up, I hit four home runs. As I rounded third base after the fourth home run, Tom Coyne said, ‘You’ve got to sign this.’ It was a contract,” Macenko recalled. Two years later Mike was recruited by John Neale, manager of Number One Lounge, one of the powerhouse teams in the PD-Major League.

“Do you want to come to Pittsburgh with us this weekend to play softball?” Neale said to him. “I’ve got to ask my mother,” said Mike, who was 18 years old. Mike’s mother gave him the green light and Tom Coyne gave him his release and Mike began a 20-year association with teams managed by John and Dave Neale. Fourteen of those years were with Steele Sports, a sporting goods firm in Grafton, Ohio, which traveled the country taking on all comers in the ancient tradition of “barnstorming.” They played more than 100 games a year. In 1986 Sports Illustrated featured them in a story headlined “Men of Steele,” which can be found on Macenko’s web site.

He was the most valuable player of five different national tournaments. He was named to 34 different all-world teams and was inducted into five different softball halls of fame. He lives in Brunswick and sells sporting goods on line.

Inductee Bio

Pos: 2B

Bats: Left – Throws: Right

Years: 1973-2000′s

Teams:

Pesano’s Restaurant, Hillcrest Tavern, Nationwide Advertising,

Cleveland Competitiors (Pro), Steeles Sports

65 National Tournament

18 National Championships

34 All World Selections

All Decade Team 1980′s

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Cleveland was the “Softball Capital of the World,” according to Buddy Langdon, a legendary softball player in the 1950s and ’60s and also the man behind the construction of the Greater Cleveland Slow Pitch Softball Hall of Fame. Cleveland gained that reputation for a reason. “The competition around here was the best in the country,” Macenko said. Cleveland sent whichever team won the city tournament every year to the world tournament. In 1976, ’77, and ’78, Macenko was on what he believed was the best team in the city. But all three years his team failed to qualify for the world tournament. Why? At that time, there was parity in softball, and with all the talent in town, any team could win with a key hit or defensive play at the right time.

Ten Inducted to Inaugural Ohio USSSA Softball Hall of Fame

Columbus, Ohio.  Almost 200 family and friends of softball welcomed ten Ohio softball legends as the inaugural members to the newly established Ohio USSSA Softball Hall of Fame.

Ceremonies were held on Sunday, 9 December 2012, at the Embassy Suites – Columbus Airport and all who participated were thrilled to be on hand for the start of this new tradition in Ohio.

Mike Macenko started his career with the USSSA in 1982 with the legendary Steele’s team that crisscrossed the country barnstorming tours in an effort to promote the game of slow pitch softball. He was a feared power hitter who in 1987 he set the single season record with an amazing 844 home runs and astounded thousands at Detroit’s Tiger Stadium by hitting a softball out of the stadium during a home run hitting contest.

Speaking on Mike’s behalf, longtime friend, coach, and business partner, Dennis Helmig of Worth Sports, spoke of Mike’s early days with Steele’s Sports, both as possibly the greatest left-handed hitter he ever saw, but someone who really helped get Steele’s Sports on the softball merchandise map.

For his part, Mike gave many thanks to USSSA, to the many sponsors who have helped along the way, to his family which supported many softball dreams both on and off the field.  He admitted to being thankful for having the talent to get paid to play but also admitted that his love for the game outweighed any payments which may have come his way.  Although a member of multiple Softball Halls of Fame, he concluded by thanking Ohio USSSA for creating this new tradition right here in Ohio where it all started and where he spent so many years enjoying the game.

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Breaking Charles Wright’s record of 503 HRs in a Season. Being Congratulated by his long-time teammate and very close friend, Craig Elliott. The record he set in 1987 of 844 HRs still stands.

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Look at their smiles, these two legends felt joy for everything that the other one accomplished in this sport. They were each other’s greatest fan. Between the two of them, they may have won over 5000 games and had at least 10,000 Home Runs total. When they played together, the chances of winning were that good …. Is it any wonder they are smiling? They were VERY close friends.

ASA Softball Hall of Fame

National Softball Hall of Fame Link

Established in 1957 by the Amateur Softball Association (ASA), the National Softball Hall of Fame and Museum is a permanent shrine to the men and women who played the game so well.

The present facility was officially dedicated May 26, 1973 and has since had two additions. The L-shaped, bi-level building houses more than 18,000 square feet of fascinating memorabilia. Photos of national champions, slow pitch and fast pitch records, uniforms of the past and present, action photographs, player profiles, trophies and plaques . . . the history of softball literally unfolds right before your eyes as you walk through the Softball Hall of Fame.

It is also an educational walk as you get a quick lesson on how bats, balls and gloves are made and see equipment from the turn of the century to the present. You can also test your knowledge of the game by participating in one of the question-and-answer game boards displayed in the museum.

Or you can take a brief rest and lean back on one of the authentic bleachers at the miniature ball field and watch softball videos on a television monitor. Each year thousands of visitors from all over the world visit the museum to pay homage to such softball immortals as Harold (Shifty) Gears, the first person inducted into the National Softball Hall of Fame; Bertha Tickey, who won 757 games during her career; Don Rardin, one of two people to play on a championship team in both open slow pitch and industrial slow pitch divisions; Joan Joyce, who was named to 18 All-America teams, and Sam Elliott, who won 1,133 games and lost only 87 in 21 years.

Other areas of interest include the Hall of Honor, established in 1976 to acknowledge contributions of non-players in five areas, international exhibits, the men and women in blue, and the State and Metro Halls of Fame honoring players, coaches, managers, sponsors, umpires, commissioners and administrators at the state and metro level.

Be sure to drop by the ASA Research Center and Library to find answers to such questions as “What’s a fungo bat?” and to browse through various softball publications including back copies of the ASA Guide, Rule Book and Umpire Manual plus the official publication of the ASA, USA Softball Magazine (formerly Balls & Strikes Softball), Doctoral dissertations, master’s theses, magazine articles, video cassettes and numerous books and souvenir programs concerning all aspects of America’s Game are also available for reading in the museum library.

A must to see while visiting the museum is the newest exhibit at the National Softball Hall of Fame-the Olympic Gallery.

“With softball now an Olympic sport, it was appropriate to have a room to display the memorabilia and chronicle softball’s long road to Olympic recognition,” said Don Porter, executive director of the ASA.

The room features four-color murals depicting softball’s road to the Olympics along with action pictures of outstanding USA Softball National Team players. In addition, the room includes a 60-inch screen TV and park benches for casual viewing of important Olympic-style events, including the 1994 World Championship in which the USA Softball Women’s National Team captured the gold.

“The opening of the Olympic Gallery is certainly a milestone in the history of softball,” Porter said.

Open year round on weekdays and on weekends from mid-March to October, the Hall of Fame also houses the headquarters of the Amateur Softball Association-USA Softball, the national governing body of amateur softball in the United States.

Conveniently located at the crossroads of America just off I-35 and I-40 in Oklahoma City, the National Softball Hall of Fame is in the same area as the acclaimed Oklahoma City Zoo, the Firefighters Museum, Kirkpatrick Center, Omniplex and Planetarium, the Cowboy Hall of Fame and the Remington Park Racetrack.

So, come on spend a few relaxing hours and tour the sport’s shrine on your next visit to Oklahoma City to find out why softball is the nation’s No. 1 team participant sport and a full-medal sport in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.


  • *1973 – Myron Reinhardt, Alexandria, KY – Catcher-Outfielder (Shield’s Contractors, Yorkshire Restaurant, Gatliff Auto MVP-1963)

  • *1974 – Frank DeLuca, Stratford, CT – Pitcher (Industrial Softball – Avco-Lycoming-Textron)

  • 1975 – Donald Rardin, Lexington, KY – Pitcher-Infielder (Gatliff Auto, Yorkshire Restaurant, IBM Industrial MVP-1966)

  • 1982 – Bill Cole, Sterling Heights, MI – Third Base (East Side Sports MVP-1962, Michael’s Lounge, Little Caesars)

  • *1984 – J.D. McDonald, McAdenville, NC – Shortstop (McAdenville, Pharr Yarn Industrial)

  • 1985 – James Galloway, Westbury, NY – Infielder (Musicaro Foods, County Sports, Empire County Astros)

  • *1986 – Hal Wiggins, Fort Thomas, KY – Outfielder (Shield’s Contractors, Lang’s Pet Shop, Gatliff Auto Sales)

  • *1987 – Carl (Tex) Collins, Detroit, MI – Catcher (Michael’s Lounge, Little Caesars)

  • 1988 – Eugene Fisher, Denver, NC – Catcher (Howard’s Furniture/Western Steer)

  • *1989 – Raymond (Whitey) Brown, Covington, KY – Third Base (Lang’s Pet Shop, Yorkshire Restaurant, Gatliff Auto Sales)

  • 1989 – Mike Gouin, Detroit, MI – Outfielder (Michael’s Lounge, Little Caesars MVP-1970)

  • *1989 – Eddie Zolna, Chicago, IL – Pitcher (Dr. Carlucci’s Bobcats 16-inch MVP-1969, 1971, 1973)

  • 1990 – Dick Bartel, San Antonio, TX – Outfielder (Ray Carpenter’s, Campbell’s Carpets, Howard’s/Western Steer)

  • *1990 – Tom Beall, Monticello, GA – Outfielder (Reed’s Nuts, Howard’s/Western Steer)

  • *1990 – Ken Clark, Stratford, CT – Pitcher (Industrial Softball – Sikorsky Aircraft)

  • 1992 – Lou Del Mastro, Pittsburgh, PA – Pitcher (Skip Hogan A.C. MVP-1965, Jim’s Sport Shop)

  • 1992 – Paul Tomasovich, Pittsburgh, PA – Third Base (Skip Hogan A.C. MVP-1964, Jim’s Sport Shop)

  • *1993 – Don Arndt, Sherrills Ford, NC – Pitcher (TWUA, Howard’s Furniture/Western Steer MVP-1972)

  • 1993 – Eddie Finnegan, Stratford, CT – Shortstop (Avco/Lycoming/Textron Industrial MVP-1968, 1971)

  • *1993 – Steve Loya, Cleveland, OH – Catcher (Swing Inn, Gene’s Sohio, Pyramid Cafe MVP-1975)

  • *1994 – Bert Smith, Charlotte, NC – Outfielder (County Sports MVP-1968, Pile Drivers MVP-1971, Howard’s MVP-1973)

  • 1994 – Richard Willborn, San Antonio, TX   Outfielder (Ray Carpenter’s, Nelson’s, Campbell’s,Howard’s/Western Steer)

  • *1996 – Stan Harvey, Gastonia, NC – Outfielder-First Base (Golden Gallons, Howard’s Furniture/Western Steer)

  • 1997 – H.T. Waller, Chipley, FL – Second Base (Jo’s Pizza House MVP-1969, Howard’s Furniture)

  • 1999 – Bruce Meade, Bradenton, FL – Outfielder-Catcher (Warren’s, Nelson’s MVP-1977, Jerry’s MVP-1982, Elite, Steele’s, Vernon’s)

  • 2000 – Bill Gatti, Louisville, KY – Catcher (Jiffy Club, Elite, Marlton Trucking, Ritch’s Major MVP-1989)

  • 2000 – Dennis Graser, Waukesha, WI – First Base (Elite, Steele’s, Starpath, Ritch’s-Superior, Spectrum)

  • 2001 – Rick Scherr, Sherrills Ford, NC, – Third Base-First Base (Howard’s MVP-1981, 1983, 1984, Superior-Apollo, Ritch’s-Superior)

  • 2001 – Don Clatterbough, Mechanicsville, VA, – Outfield (Bradley’s, Blanton’s, Kirk’s/Ritch’s, Starpath)

  • 2002 – Ronnie Ford, Jacksonville, FL – Outfielder (Warren Motors MVP-1976, Elite Coating, Jerry’s, Vernon’s ASA Class-A MVP-1990)

  • 2007 – Mike Macenko, Brooke Park, OH – Second Base (Hillcrest Tavern, Steele’s Sports MVP-1987, 1990, Sunbelt/Worth, Ritch’s-Superior)

  • 2010 – Mike Shenk, Ephrata, PA – Third Base (Taylor Brothers, Shen Valley, Lighthouse, Team TPS, Ritch’s-Superior, Long Haul/TPS)

  • 2012 – Jerry King, Maysville, KY – Third Base (DuBoise Chemical, Campbell’s Carpets, Steele’s Sports, Danny’s Drilling)

  • *2014 – Craig Elliott, Wadley, AL – Pitcher (Tom’s Foods, Ken Sanders MVP-1978, Elite Coatings, Steele’s Sports MVP-1985, MVP-1986, Stewarts)

  • 2015 – John Davide, Centereach, NY – Short Stop (Empire County Sports, Pepsico)

  • 2017 – Mark Martin, Orlando, FL (Bell Corp)

  • 2017 – Willie Simpson, Chicago, IL

  • 2018 – Charles Wright, Ellerslie, GA (Ritch’s/Superior, Steele’s)

  • 2018 – Ricky Huggins, Pembroke, GA (Lighthouse)

  • 2018 – Todd Joerling, New Melle, MO (Bell Corp)

  • 2019 – Ron Parnell, Highland, CA (Ritchs/Superior)

  • 2019 – Britt Hightower, Houston, TX (Ritchs/Superior)

  • 2019 – Mike Nye, Jacksonville, FL (Warren Motors)

  • 2020 – Cecil Whitehead, Valdosta, GA (Ritchs/Superior)

  • 2020 – Curtis Williams

  • 2020 – Doug Roberson, Royal Palm Beach, FL (Ritchs/Superior)

  • 2020 – Carl Rose, Valdosta, GA (Lighthouse)

 

*Player is deceased.